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Keepers of the Earth Native American Stories and Environmental Activities for Children

A selection of traditional tales from various Indian peoples, each accompanied by instructions for related activities dealing with aspects of the environment.
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Native American Animal Stories

A collection of stories which "demonstrate the power of animals in Native American traditions." Includes "Glossary and pronunciation key, Tribal Nation descriptions," and "Other versions of Native American stories."
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The Oneida Creation Story

The Oneida Creation Story is the oldest tradition of the Onyota'aka (People of the Standing Stone) and is one of the greatest pieces of oral literature of Native North American. Ancient elements of Iroquoian cosmology are the heart of the saga: Sky-world, the fall of Sky-woman, the creation of Earth upon Turtle's back, and the creation of mankind and early society by the twins. Various versions have been passed
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Memories of Lac du Flambeau Elders

A collection of interviews with 15 Ojibwe elders of the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians in northern Wisconsin. The elders, in their 70s and 80s when interviewed, all experienced enormous changes in their lifetimes. They discuss these changes as well as Ojibwe traditions and beliefs
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After Columbus: The Smithsonian Chronicle of the North American Indians

Facts and implications of Indian and white interaction in America.
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A Tale for the Time Being

A time being is someone who lives in time, and that means you, and me, and every one of us who is, or was, or ever will be. In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao Yasutani, a Japanese schoolgirl has decided there is only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates' bullying. But before she ends it all, Nao first plans to document the life of her great grandmother, Jiko, a Buddhist nun who's lived more than a century. But Nao actually ends up writing her own life story; the diary is her only solace, and will touch lives in ways she can scarcely imagine. Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on the shore of Canada's Vancouver Island, where she discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox, possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. The diary is in a freezer bag with some old letters in French and a vintage watch and Ruth begins to investigate how the bag traveled from Japan to her island, and why it contains what it does. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao's drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future. Full of the author's signature humor and deeply engaged with the relationship between writer and reader, past and present, fact and fiction, quantum physics, history, and myth, this is a brilliantly inventive, beguiling story of our shared humanity and the search for home. -- Provided by publisher.
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Handbook for Writers

A multimedia resource that guides users through all stages of the writing process. Includes the author's 5th ed. of her textbook together with a CD-ROM that provides instant access to the text, as well as direct access to the World Wide Web site containing additional help and information.
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Biodiversity

Intended for scientists and nonscientists, this book focuses on the loss of plant and animal species to increasing human population pressure and the demands of economic development. It creates a framework for analyzing the problem and searching for possible solutions.
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The Diversity of Life

"In the Amazon Basin the greatest violence sometimes begins as a flicker of light beyond the horizon. There in the perfect bowl of the night sky, untouched by light from any human source, a thunderstorm sends its premonitory signal and begins a slow journey to the observer, who thinks: the world is about to change." Watching from the edge of the Brazilian rain forest, witness to the sort of violence nature visits upon its creatures, Edward O. Wilson reflects on the crucible of evolution, and so begins his remarkable account of how the living world became diverse and how humans are destroying that diversity. Wilson, internationally regarded as the dean of biodiversity studies, conducts us on a tour through time, traces the processes that create new species in bursts of adaptive radiation, and points out the cataclysmic events that have disrupted evolution and diminished global diversity over the past 600 million years. The five enormous natural blows to the planet (such as meteorite strikes and climatic changes) required 10 to 100 million years of evolutionary repair. The sixth great spasm of extinction on earth - caused this time entirely by humans - may be the one that breaks the crucible of life. Wilson identifies this crisis in countless ecosystems around the globe: coral reefs, grasslands, rain forests, and other natural habitats. Drawing on a variety of examples such as the decline of bird populations in the United States, the extinction of many species of freshwater fish in Africa and Asia, and the rapid disappearance of flora and fauna as the rain forests are cut down, he poignantly describes the death throes of the living worlds diversity - projected to decline as much as 20 percent by the year 2020. All evidence marshaled here resonates through Wilson's tightly reasoned call for a spirit of stewardship over the worlds biological wealth. He makes a plea for specific actions that will enhance rather than diminish not just diversity but the quality of life on earth. Cutting through the tangle of environmental issues that often obscure the real concern, Wilson maintains that the era of confrontation between forces for the preservation of nature and those for economic development is over; he convincingly drives home the point that both aims can, and must, be integrated. Unparalleled in its range and depth, Wilson's masterwork is essential reading for those who care about preserving the worlds biological variety and ensuring our planets health.
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Earth in Mind: On Education, Environment, and the Human Prospect

In Earth in Mind, Orr focuses not on problems in education, but on the problem of education. Much of what has gone wrong with the world, he argues, is the result of inadequate and misdirected education that alienates us from life in the name of human domination; causes students to worry about how to make a living before they know who they are; overemphasizes success and careers; separates feeling from intellect and the practical from the theoretical and deadens the sense of wonder for the created world. The crisis we face, Orr explains, is one of mind, perception, and values. It is, first and foremost, an educational challenge.
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