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People of Corn: A Mayan Story

After several unsuccessful attempts to create gratefull creatures, the Mayan gods use sacred corn to fashion a people who will thank and praise their creators.

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Book
Northwoods Cradle Song From a Menominee Lullaby

A poetic adaptation of a Menominee Indian lullaby that describes the sights and sounds of night.

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Book
Approaches to Discourse

A guide to the various frameworks, concepts, and methods available for the analysis of discourse with linguistics.

Click here to view WorldCat record for Approaches to Discourse.

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Book
Basics of Qualitative Research

Shows the steps involved in data analysis (from description to grounded theory) and data gathering by means of theoretical sampling.

Click here to view WorldCat record for Basics of Qualitative Research 3e.

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Book
Collecting and Interpreting Qualitative Materials

In this, the third of a three-volume paperback version of the landmark Handbook of Qualitative Research, editors Norman K. Denzin and Yvonna S. Lincoln turn to the tasks of collecting, analyzing, and interpreting qualitative materials.

Click here to view WorldCat record for Collecting and Interpreting Qualitative Materials.

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Book
Wild Ricing

Artwork created by Patrick Foote, Oneida artist, depicting two people in a canoe collecting wild rice with knodckers.

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POSOH Twahwatsi láyΛ Mural

The POSOH Twahwatsi láyΛ Mural, painted by Anthony Gauthier, encompasses examples of different agricultural practices found throughout Wisconsin. These practices include the Three Sisters Garden, a sustainable dairy farm called Dairy Dreams, and many others. The mural is meant to be used with various lessons created in coordination with it. Separate portions of the mural can be found within different lessons of the Twahwatsi láyΛ Unit.

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This digital heritage item contains pdfs of both the large and small things cards from the POSOH Netāēnawemākanak Unit.

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CAF (Conceptual Activity Flow) 5 of the Grade 7 unit includes the following lessons:

  • Lesson 1: In this lesson, students read a story that leads to an inquiry about how we can investigate and understand an ecosystem that has undergone a shift. Throughout the lesson, students analyze data to develop an evidence-based explanation for the changes depicted in the case study.
  • Lesson 2: Students begin this lesson by watching a shortened version of a video from the Minnesota White Pine Society that tells the story of the Minnesota white pines. As a natural extension to learning the Minnesota white pine story, students are then presented with the question: What is the story of the white pine in the Menominee Forest? To figure out the story of the Menominee Forest white pines, students conduct research to learn about the Menominee’s white pine, which they then compare and contrast to the story of the white pine in Minnesota.
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pdf

CAF (Conceptual Activity Flow) 4 of the Grade 7 unit includes the following lessons:

  • Lesson 1: In this lesson, students read a story written from the Menominee perspective of “all my relatives.” After reading the story together, students reflect on the story in a talking circle to develop initial understandings of Netaenawemākanak. This lesson forms the foundation of CAF 4 in which students move from thinking about individual organisms and their needs to thinking about the interactions amongst the things in the Forest.
  • Lesson 2: In this lesson, students will use a Menominee word, Netaenawemākanak, (pronounced nah-taen-away-mahkah- nuk, meaning all my relatives), during a web-making activity, to demonstrate the interconnectedness of various Forest Things. Students will use the common needs of the Forest Things that were identified in Lesson 3.3 to learn about relationships between these Things, which tie them to each other and the unique place of the Menominee Forest.
  • Lesson 3: In this lesson, students are guided through a series of small to large group discussions to use the class relationship web constructed in the previous lesson as a model to further understand ecological interactions.
  • Lesson 4: In this lesson, students apply their knowledge of ecological interactions to analyze population change graphs and hypothesize potential reasons for changes in population.
  • Lesson 5: Students begin by intuitively classifying the Things or organisms from the earlier lessons. They work in cooperative small groups to sort into logical groupings a set of cards on which each has a picture of one organism encountered before. After students have engaged in the intellectual challenge of sorting their cards according to similarities, they discuss as a whole class the rationale they used in sorting.
  • Lesson 6: This culminating lesson for CAF 1-4 provides an important opportunity for students to apply the ideas learned in the unit so far and use their Forest models to develop an evidence-based explanation.
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CAF (Conceptual Activity Flow) 3 of the Grade 7 unit includes the following lessons:

  • Lesson 1: During this lesson, students read an excerpt from a story adapted from the Abenaki, an Algonquin-speaking people of northeastern North America. The story tells of a man who was granted a wish to learn how to hunt better by listening to the voices of the animals. Then, students engage in a discussion that is grounded in the reading of another story about how they might learn about the Menominee Forest by listening to the things in the forest. Here, the teacher facilitates students in understanding how learning about something from the alternate perspective of the Thing being learned about can be a form of “listening” to it.
  • Lesson 2: In this lesson, students write a story from the perspective of a Thing in the Forest that integrates information from various sources about the needs of the Thing and how the Thing interacts with others in the Forest, including Menominee People. Through this experience, students identify various sources of knowledge that they can turn to as they investigate their Things, including interviewing community members in ways that align with Menominee conceptions of respect and relationships. Ways of learning from the community are taught with the help of a POSOH video about asking and listening with respect and purpose.
  • Lesson 3: This lesson guides students in learning from each other’s stories to build understanding that Things—while different in many ways—share common needs, including nutrition, air, water, light and/or temperature, space, etc. Students collect data as they learn from each other’s stories about the needs of the various Things living in the Menominee Forest.
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